Hugo Kornelis is a Data Platform MVP and an established SQL Server Community expert. He writes, blogs, speaks, tech edits, and researches, focusing mostly on SQL Server performance and execution plans. He was the technical editor for the third edition of Grant Fritchey's "SQL Server Execution Plans". In 2018 he started a project to document all behaviour of SQL Server execution plans at his website, "the SQL Server Execution Plan Reference" (https://sqlserverfast.com/epr)

When not working for the community, Hugo is busy at his day job: freelance database developer./consultant. Hugo has 20 years of experience on SQL Server in various roles. He has a strong database design background but has since specialized into query tuning and execution plans.
Hugo Kornelis has submitted 2 sessions for SQLBits 2020, although the agenda hasn't been chosen yet. See all submitted sessions.

Pending Sessions

Execution plans are key to understanding bad query performance. But they can be overwhelming to the new user. Where to start? This session will show the basics!
When seeing execution plans, you might be overwhelmed with all the different operators. What do they all do? Where to focus first? In this session, we will only focus on operators that are most likely to cause slowness.

Sessions

Previous Sessions

This session will present you with a fascinating behind-the-scenes deep-dive view of the new column store index feature. How do column store indexes work? How are they built? And how can they yield such enormous performance boosts to some workloads?
In this demo-rich session, Hugo Kornelis shows how the full syntax of MERGE enables more than just synchronizing data. You'll get an overview of all the available options, plus a few surprising pitfalls you may not be aware of.
Indexes are the best instrument for query optimization. But what kind of indexes and on what columns? The key to answering those questions is understanding how indexes are stored and used by SQL Server. And that is exactly what this session is about.
T-SQL user-defined functions may appear to be a good tool for code encapsulation and reuse, but they can have a dramatic impact on performance. In this session, you'll see why they slow down your queries, and how you can avoid this performance hit.
Many people think that normalization stops at Third Normal Form. But there are lots of higher normal forms. And they are not as complex or as irrelevant as often claimed. If you want to design better databases, then come attend this session!
SQL Server 2019 includes new query processing features such as batch mode on rowstore, memory grant feedback, approximate query processing, and more. How do these work? Are they as good as Microsoft wants us to believe?
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