Kalen Delaney has been working with SQL Server for over 32 years, providing advanced SQL Server training to clients around the world. She was a SQL Server MVP for 25 years, since 1993, until starting to work for Microsoft. She has been writing about SQL Server almost as long as she has been using it. Kalen has spoken at dozens of technical conferences, including every PASS conference in the US and multiple TechEd events in both the US and Europe. Kalen is the author or co-author of many books on SQL Server, the most recent being SQL Server 2016 Internals: In-memory OLTP, from Red Gate.   
Kalen Delaney has submitted 2 sessions for SQLBits 2020, although the agenda hasn't been chosen yet. See all submitted sessions.

Pending Sessions

This session will explore the changes to In-memory OLTP (aka Hekaton) since its original implementation, including SQL Server’s ability to create memory-optimized system tables in SQL Server 2019.
Data is important and metadata even more so! How does SQL Server keep track of what you're keeping track of and what you’re doing? We’ll look at the various types of metadata and explore the metadata using T-SQL queries.

Sessions

Previous Sessions

In this session, I’ll tell you about some of my favorite undocumented features, and also tell you some of my tricks for discovering more undocumented secrets.
In this session, we'll explore SQL Server's plan cache, including techniques for discovering what plans are in cache, how often they've been run, and whether they contain any sub-optimal operators. Knowing what's happened is the first step in tuning.
Locking and blocking is SQL Server’s default method of managing concurrency in a multi-user environment. In this session we’ll look at the three main aspects of locking, including when locks cause blocking and also examine ways to minimize blocking.
This session looks inside the transaction log to see exactly what is logged for minimally logged operations in each of the recovery models. We also look at other factors in our SQL Server operations that affect what is actually written to the log.
A look inside SQL Server distribution statistics
Look inside Query Store to see what it does and how it works
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