Tabular Editor is an open source offline editor experience for SSAS Tabular, which offers lots of features in a simple UI that can vastly improve your productivity when developing Tabular Models at compatibility level 1200+
In this session, I'm going to show you six amazing tools that must be in your developer/consultant toolbelt. These tools help you develop, manage, monitor and optimize your Tabular model, in other words, it makes your day to day job easier.
This session will explore the Tabular Model Scripting Language (TMSL); how TMSL can be used with PowerShell to automate the creation and deployment of an Analysis Services Tabular Model.
This session will reveal what's new for Azure Analysis Services in the areas of performance, scalability, advanced calculations, model management, and monitoring.
An IoT analytics solution addressing real-life issues with SCADA data from a network of 600 Waste Water Treatment Plants and 100s of Pumping Stations. An end-to-end solution with Azure Data Warehouse, Azure Data Factory, Azure Analysis Services and PowerBI
Think you know MDX? This session will show you some advanced, little-known but nonetheless practical tips and tricks for writing complex calculations and making your queries run faster.
Continuous Integration is not normally associated with data warehouse projects due to the perceived complexity of implementation. John will be showing how modern tools make it simple to apply Continuous Integration techniques to data warehouse projects
Tabular offers only one-to-many relationships on a single column: it seems poor when compared with Multidimensional. However, with DAX, you can handle any relationship. We analyze and solve scenarios with calculated, virtual and complex many-to-many.
A SSAS MDX Deep Dive session covering the implementation of a business requirement to identify rogue behaviour over time and within SCD organisation groups.
This session goes beyond the classical star schema modeling, exploring new techniques to model data with Power Pivot and SSAS Tabular. You will see how brute-force power in DAX allows different data models than those used in SSAS Multidimensional