4th - 7th March 2015

ExCeL London Exhibition and Convention Centre, London

Conor Cunningham

Conor Cunningham is a Principal Software Architect at Microsoft on the SQL Server Query Processor Team.  He's worked on database technologies for Microsoft for over 10 years and is holds numerous patents related to Query Optimization and Query Processing.  Conor is the author of a number of peer-reviewed articles on query optimization techniques.  Recently, he authored a chapter for the book "Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Internals" on how the Query Optimizer works.  He publishes a blog called "Conor vs. SQL" (http://blogs.msdn.com/conor_cunningham_msft/default.aspx)  where he answers questions about databases.
http://blogs.msdn.com/conor_cunningham_msft/default.aspx

Understand the Query Optimiser from the man who knows!
Ever wanted to know exactly what is happening underneath the covers in your queries. Let me show you.
This talk will describe how the new ColumnStore index technology in SQL Server 2012 makes queries go faster. Covering details of the storage and execution model, how this model interacts with modern CPUs to deliver significant performance benefits.
This talk will cover how the distributed query feature in SQL Server works, end-to-end. Topics include the query model, metadata, query optimization, execution, distributed transactions, and scale-out scenarios via Distributed Partitioned Views(DPV)
This talk will explain the patterns that we recommend to customers when designing data warehouses. This talk will help people learning about DW for the first time and also give insight for those who wish to learn more.
While there are many similarities between SQL Server and SQL Azure, there are different kinds of applications that are easier to build in one or the other.  One of the major differences relates to how to build an application that “scales”.  This presentation will provide an introduction into the difference between scale-up (SQL Server) and scale-out (SQL Azure) architectures and give you a primer on how you can build a large, Internet-facing service that can scale to arbitrarily large sizes on commodity hardware.  This talk is targeted at SQL Server practitioners to give them a working knowledge of how the two platforms differ based on Microsoft’s experiences with its largest Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) customers running on SQL Azure.